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14th April 2016

What is in store with CQCs proposed 2016-2021 Strategy? Part 1

I hope your week was good.  It was the Easter Holidays and we made tracks to Devon. Time to reflect on a new topic.

CQC have efficiencies to make as they feel the snip of red tape. I review inspection and registration in their 2016-21 strategy consultation: ‘Shaping the Future’.

Uncertain ground

Before I became too engrossed, I went for a family walk. There was a deal of rain this morning and the sky was watery grey even when it stopped.  We padded down to the beach after a debate on wellies or trainers. I won with wellies. The sand isn’t as firm as it looks after rain, it sinks in places and the sky threatened change again.

I can feel uncertain ground for CQC too. The Chair and Chief Executive pen; ‘we need to build on our current regulatory approach and improve its efficiency and effectiveness. At the same time, we need to adapt to the changes in the health and care sectors we regulate. We have to achieve all of this with fewer resources.’ That feels like lots of plates to spin …especially if resource is removed to spin them.

What does it mean?

Theme 1: Improving our use of data and information

The CQC indicate working towards better use and sharing of information they and their partners hold. This included developing a key data set and gathering more user voice which would help target risk and poor care with a mention of less inspection for some good and outstanding providers hurrah!

A doctor family member always says, ‘look at the patient not just the thermometer’. That is handy advice in my view, and similarly, although a powerful aid, information and data quality can lead to queries for the provider.

Theme 2: Implementing a single shared view of quality

This is interesting, providers could use a shared framework based on the 5 questions to monitor their own performance and share with CQC. Local oversight bodies could also use it. This sounds a lot like the PIR already used in adult social care, hopefully with some tweaks.

This theme to me means self-assessment.....a rose by any other name is still a rose! But an excellent opportunity if your policies and procedures and data sets are already formatted to the 5 questions. QCS policies have a helpful mapping to the KLOEs already. CQC acknowledge in the document no rating would be on provider information alone.

In closing

So far, less resource means less physical presence. Is it more efficient? Or a different set of problems for CQC and providers?

It didn’t rain again, but I squelched a little on the walk home. My wellie heel had begun to let in water as I stood in the shallows...there are some things you just cannot legislate for!

Although the consultation process is now closed, you can read the strategy consultation here. Join me in exploring two more themes in my next blog.

Abi Spence – QCS Registration and Inspection Expert Contributor

2 thoughts on “What is in store with CQCs proposed 2016-2021 Strategy? Part 1”

  1. Lorraine Moorhead says:

    .Hi Abi

    Perhaps we should all start to appreciate more, the work, care individuals actually do in the time allowed. I am a care worker by choice. I can wager none of your inspectors or the people who make the legislation, could actually achieve what I achieve in half an hour with a service user. There are too many statutory regulations. Simplify the system and bring them all together to say the same thing and have the same meaning. The system is just too complicated and risking the future of care in the community. I value the contribution I make to my service users. I wouldn’t dream of treating them any differently to my own family or myself. My standards are very high.

    Carers are pushed for time earning minimum wage keeping lots of families freed up from the complication of caring for an elderly relative brings to their life. It’s time all of you legislative people started viewing carers as people rather than machines or Donkeys.

    1. Anna Pavan says:

      Thank you for your comments. You are right to highlight carers and the quality care, support and commitment that this vital role brings. It is a life saver and a life giver. My recent blog on cutting red tape reflects this. Simplifications across regulation can be made to ease the burden whilst ensuring regulation does what it needs to do to keep people safe.

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