Right Support, Right Care, Right Culture

October 26, 2020

CQC launch new guidance to support autism and/or learning disability services.

Getting it right

Updating their approach to registering autism and learning disability services, CQC has launched Right Support, Right Care Right Culture.  Launched in 2016, the original guidance was a long time coming and struggled to be completely clear in its message. CQC have been trying to navigate their own path to ensuring those services that are registered are fit for purpose, in the light of findings from Winterbourne View hospital and responses to it.

Clearer vision

The new guidance brings greater clarity to the sector, is drawn from best practice and NICE guidelines but other services take note, in my opinion these ways of working should permeate all service types, especially those that accommodate people with dementia.

So, what does it say?

It breaks down some simple principles. CQC say:

  • Right support – The model of care and setting should maximise people’s choice, control and independence
  • Right care – Care should be person-centred and promote people’s dignity, privacy and human rights
  • Right culture – The ethos, values, attitudes and behaviours of leaders and care staff should ensure people using services lead confident, inclusive and empowered lives

Bursting the myths?

CQC say there has never been an upper limit or lower limit of beds, but it is about assessing the suitability of the home in maintaining people’s dignity and privacy, in facilitating person-centred care in line with current best practice guidance and not being developed as new campus or congregate settings.

Meeting requirements

The regulations themselves give the structure of what needs to be met to gain registration and successfully go through inspection, but in addition and to make it crystal clear, CQC outline:

  • There is a clear need for the service and it has been agreed by commissioners
  • The size, setting and design of the service meet people’s expectations and align with current best practice
  • People have access to the community
  • The model of care, policies and procedures are in line with current best practice

When does it apply?

This does not just apply to new registrations, but for those that are expanding their service needing a change to their registration.

Still unsure?

CQC have provided case studies to show how they have granted or refused registration – a useful tool at the very outset of planning registration.

Whether you are a service in scope or one that this guidance does not affect, if you are setting out to create an offering to the sector…take a look through the guidance, consult the people you are looking to support, and consider what a person-centred approach looks like for your setting.

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Abi Spence

Registration and Inspection Specialist

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